striped mongoose

Mungos mungo

Common name

striped mongoose

Habitat

It is found in a wide range of habitats, mainly in savannahs, wooded savannahs, wooded areas, dry scrub areas and rocky areas of the savannah. They are closely related to termite mounds.
Features

Family

Herpestidae
Subfamily: Mungotinae

Medals

carnivora

Class

Mammalia

Gestation

60 days.

Number of offspring

1–4

Preproduction

Diet

Predominantly insectivorous, especially based on beetles and centipede larvae, and occasionally small vertebrates (including eggs, mice, rats, frogs, lizards and snakes).

Life

17 years.

Biology and behavior

Strictly diurnal, they live in groups that can reach 40 members. Based on scientific studies, it appears that this is a matriarchal system in which a few females reproduce. The hierarchy among individuals in the group appears to be based more on the age, size, and temperament of the individuals than on sex. The groups are stable, although young males usually leave the group and it can even divide when the number of its members is very high.

The births of the females are synchronized so that they all give birth at the same time, each of them being able to breastfeed any offspring.

They usually go out to hunt alone with their nose pressed to the ground in search of insects and small vertebrates, although they have also been seen carrying out group hunts when the prey is larger, as is the case with snakes. Once they detect prey under the ground, they prepare to quickly dig to capture it. They have a curious technique for opening eggs or prey with hard shells that consists of throwing them against the ground or against stones with their hind legs.

Some
curiosities

The striped mongoose marks its territory daily. All members of the group are also marked on the rump, members of the same group sharing the same smell.

African savanna
Wetlands
africans
Habitats
Equatorial jungle
Madagascar Island