Kirk's Dik-dik

Madoqua kirkii

Common name

Kirk's Dik-dik

Habitat

It lives in arid areas of thick scrub that do not extend far into the savanna and where, in addition to feeding, it can hide. They don't need much water.
Features

Family

Bovidae, Subfamily: Antilopinae

Medals

Artiodactyla

Class

Mammalia

Gestation

About 170 days.

Number of offspring

1

Preproduction

ESB

Diet

Herbivorous, based on easily digestible plant matter and with a small amount of fiber. 80% of their diet consists of leaves from trees and shrubs, 17% comes from grasses, and the rest from grasses and reeds.

Life

17 years.

Biology and behavior

Kirk's dik-dik is the smallest antelope in Africa, measuring 55-72 cm long from head to tail, 30-40 cm high at the shoulders and weighing 560-680 grams for females and 725-795 grams the males.

Its coloration ranges from yellowish gray to reddish brown on its back and from gray to white on its belly. The males have horns. A very distinctive characteristic of this species is that its snout has a particular elongation like a proboscis.

Dik-diks are shy and elusive animals, which spend most of their time hiding in the bushes. When they are surprised, they perform quick zig-zag races called “zik-zik” or “dik-dik”, hence their name.

The population density is around 24 adults per square km. Family groups mark their territory through a process known as “defecation ceremony” in which the female and the male participate. Territorial conflicts are not frequent, but occasionally they occur.

Some
curiosities

They feed mainly in two periods, from dawn to mid-morning and from mid-afternoon to dusk. Although their size is very small, their metabolic needs are very high, they consume more food per kilogram of body mass than other larger herbivores. size.

The Kirk's dik-dik is heavily hunted in some areas of its range because of its skin, which is used in the production of gloves. It takes the skin of an entire animal to make a single glove.

African savanna
Wetlands
africans
Habitats
Equatorial jungle
Madagascar Island