Angolan Lion

Panthera leo bleyenberghi

Common name

Angolan Lion

Habitat

African savannah and semi-desert areas.
Features

Family

Felidae
Subfamily: Pantherinae

Medals

carnivora

Class

Mammalia

Gestation

92-119 days

Number of offspring

1–4

Preproduction

Diet

Generalist carnivores, although medium and large ungulates make up most of their diet, they can feed on a wide variety of vertebrates, from small mice to young rhinoceroses, hippos and elephants, including birds, reptiles, fish and even insects.

Life

12 years in the wild, up to 25 years in captivity.

Biology and behavior

The lion is one of the four large felids belonging to the genus Panthera. The adult male is easily recognizable by its large size and striking mane, and has an approximate weight of 150 – 250 kg. Females are usually considerably smaller, weighing 110 – 180 kg. It is the second largest felid in the world, after the tiger.

In social groups, the females are in charge of searching for food and taking care of the young, while the males protect the herd.

Their mane serves to protect their neck during battles, to protect themselves from thorny bushes, and is thicker the lower the temperature. The color of their fur is another adaptation to the environment, as it serves as camouflage to hunt, mainly, since they do not usually fall prey to other animals (except for hyenas in the case of sick, elderly or young animals). They hunt by stalking (about 30 m or less from their prey) to avoid spending excess energy compared to what they obtain from the prey they pursue, thus, they never run excessively (but they can reach 56 km/h).

Its natural conservation status is vulnerable, mainly due to the destruction of its habitat (crops, grazing, human settlements...).

Some
curiosities

Male lions usually stand at the top of rock formations called kopjes, from where they have a panoramic view of the entire savannah and carry out the task of protecting the group, although females also protect the cubs in these formations.

African savanna
Wetlands
africans
Habitats
Equatorial jungle
Madagascar Island