African Jabiru

Ephippiorhynchus senegalensis

Common name

African Jabiru

Habitat

It lives in large wetlands of fresh, brackish or salt water, such as surface water marshes, river margins and lake shores, swampy areas and alluvial plains, where there is an abundance of fish and large trees nearby for nesting.
Features

Family

Ciconiidae

Medals

ciconiiformes

Class

Birds

Gestation

30-35 days

Number of offspring

1–5

Preproduction

ESB

Diet

Its diet consists mainly of fish 15-30 cm long and weighing more than 500 g, as well as crustaceans, frogs, reptiles, small mammals, mollusks and insects.

Life

12 years in the wild and 19 in captivity.

Biology and behavior

They are usually found alone or in pairs on the edge of rivers and are easily recognizable by their long, brightly colored beak. Its plumage is iridescent black with white primary flight feathers.

The male is larger and heavier than the female. Additionally, males have brown eyes while females have golden yellow eyes.

They are silent except for the crocodile they make with their beak to show excitement.

They do not form reproductive colonies, but rather the couple builds a large nest with branches and sticks at the top of a tree, which can reach 2 m in diameter and where the female lays between 1 and 5 eggs, generally 3 or 4, which will be incubated by both the father and the mother for approximately one month.

Some
curiosities

To avoid overheating, it pants vigorously and ruffles its sun-heated outer feathers away from its body. Adults fill their beaks with water regularly to cool their chicks or eggs. They even defecate on their paws to leave them covered in white feces.

African savanna
Wetlands
africans
Habitats
Equatorial jungle
Madagascar Island